The Social-Engineer Podcast

Welcome to the Social-Engineer Podcast: The Doctor Is In Series – where we will discuss understandings and developments in the field of psychology.

 

In today’s episode, Chris and Abbie are discussing Overworking. They will talk about the causes, symptoms and what you can do to combat it. [May 6, 2024]

 

00:00 - Intro

00:17 - Dr. Abbie Maroño Intro

00:47 - Intro Links

-          Social-Engineer.com - http://www.social-engineer.com/

-          Managed Voice Phishing - https://www.social-engineer.com/services/vishing-service/

-          Managed Email Phishing - https://www.social-engineer.com/services/se-phishing-service/

-          Adversarial Simulations - https://www.social-engineer.com/services/social-engineering-penetration-test/

-          Social-Engineer channel on SLACK - https://social-engineering-hq.slack.com/ssb

-          CLUTCH - http://www.pro-rock.com/

-          innocentlivesfoundation.org - http://www.innocentlivesfoundation.org/                                

04:37 - The Topic of the Day: Overworking

05:17 - Working vs Overworking

06:35 - Telltale Signs

08:47 - Keep Balanced

10:35 - Apples and Oranges

15:08 - Time for a Rest

19:52 - Do the Right Thing

21:49 - The Illusion of Control

24:58 - Bury the Bad

27:11 - Accountability of Emotions

28:58 - Lack of Boundaries

30:12 - Communication is Key!

35:58 - Tides are Turning

36:58 - Wrap Up

37:15 - Next Month: Internal Motivation

37:33 - Outro                                                                    

-          www.social-engineer.com

-          www.innocentlivesfoundation.org

 

Find us online:

-          Twitter: @DrAbbieofficial

-          LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/dr-abbie-maroño-phd

-          Instagram: @DoctorAbbieofficial

-          Twitter: @humanhacker

-          LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/christopherhadnagy

 

 

References:

Chandola, T., Brunner, E., & Marmot, M. (2010). Chronic stress at work and the metabolic syndrome: Prospective study. BMJ, 332(7540), 521-525. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38693.435301.80

Cohen, S., Janicki-Deverts, D., & Miller, G. E. (2012). Psychological stress and disease. Journal of the American Medical Association, 298(14), 1685-1687. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.298.14.1685

Kivimäki, M., Jokela, M., Nyberg, S. T., Singh-Manoux, A., Fransson, E. I., Alfredsson, L., ... & Theorell, T. (2015). Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603,838 individuals. The Lancet, 386(10005), 1739-1746. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60295-1

Maslach, C., & Leiter, M. P. (2016). Understanding the burnout experience: Recent research and its implications for psychiatry. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 173(6), 1235-1241. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15040416

Nakata, A. (2011). Work hours, sleep sufficiency, and prevalence of depression among full-time employees: A community-based cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 72(5), 605-614. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06447gry

Palmer, K. T., Harris, E. C., Coggon, D. (2007). Chronic musculoskeletal pain in working populations: Where there is smoke, there is work to be done. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 64(4), 219-220. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.2006.031252

Schaufeli, W. B., & Bakker, A. B. (2004). Job demands, job resources, and their relationship with burnout and engagement: A multi-sample study. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25(3), 293-315.

Sonnentag, S. (2012). Psychological detachment from work during leisure time: The benefits of mentally disengaging from work. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(2), 114-118.

Virtanen, M., Ferrie, J. E., Singh-Manoux, A., Shipley, M. J., Stansfeld, S. A., Marmot, M. G., ... & Kivimäki, M. (2011). Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: A 5-year follow-up of the Whitehall II study. Psychological Medicine, 41(12), 2485-2494. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291711000171

Young, K. S. (2017). The relationship between depression, anxiety, and smartphone addiction among university students. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 6(3), 434-445.


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